Trump, Kim set to meet at 9 a.m. June 12

WASHINGTON, U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un are set to meet at 9 a.m. on June 12 in Singapore, the White House said Monday.

The logistics for the historic summit are "finalizing" with "significant progress" in preparatory talks, according to White House press secretary Sarah Sanders.

The on-again, off-again meeting was reinstated Friday after Trump met with a senior North Korean official at the White House. Kim Yong-chol, vice chairman of the central committee of North Korea's ruling Workers' Party, delivered a letter from Kim Jong-un.

Trump has said his goal is to get rid of North Korea's nuclear weapons, but he has also played down expectations a breakthrough could be reached in one meeting.

Sanders said the U.S. will continue its "maximum pressure" policy on North Korea until its dismantles its nuclear weapons program.

"Our policy hasn't changed. And as the president stated, we have sanctions on. They're very powerful, and we would not take those sanctions off unless North Korea denuclearized," she said at a regular news briefing, remarks that followed Trump's abandonment of the term "maximum pressure" over improving ties.

On the letter, Sanders quoted the president as saying it was "interesting" but refused to discuss specifics.

Source: Yonhap News Agency

Trump, Kim set to meet at 9 a.m. June 12

WASHINGTON, U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un are set to meet at 9 a.m. on June 12 in Singapore, the White House said Monday.

The logistics for the historic summit are "finalizing" with "significant progress" in preparatory talks, according to White House press secretary Sarah Sanders.

The on-again, off-again meeting was reinstated Friday after Trump met with a senior North Korean official at the White House. Kim Yong-chol, vice chairman of the central committee of North Korea's ruling Workers' Party, delivered a letter from Kim Jong-un.

Trump has said his goal is to get rid of North Korea's nuclear weapons, but he has also played down expectations a breakthrough could be reached in one meeting.

Sanders said the U.S. will continue its "maximum pressure" policy on North Korea until its dismantles its nuclear weapons program.

"Our policy hasn't changed. And as the president stated, we have sanctions on. They're very powerful, and we would not take those sanctions off unless North Korea denuclearized," she said at a regular news briefing, remarks that followed Trump's abandonment of the term "maximum pressure" over improving ties.

On the letter, Sanders quoted the president as saying it was "interesting" but refused to discuss specifics.

Source: Yonhap News Agency

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