S. Korean president, UNESCO chief vow efforts toward inter-Korean reconciliation

PARIS, The leaders of South Korea and UNESCO agreed Tuesday to promote reconciliation between the divided Koreas partly through increased assistance for North Korea in education and other areas.

In a meeting held in Paris, South Korean President Moon Jae-in and UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay also agreed to joint efforts to designate the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) as a biosphere reserve, a move that comes after Moon and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un agreed to turn the DMZ into a peace zone in their bilateral summits held in April and May.

The DMZ is a four-kilometer wide buffer zone along the heavily-fortified military demarcation line that separates the two Koreas.

The Koreas technically remain at war as the 1950-53 Korean War ended only with an armistice. Moon last met with the North Korean leader in Pyongyang in September, in which the leaders declared a de facto end to the war by signing what Seoul has called a non-aggression pact.

"President Moon expressed gratitude that Director-General Azoulay has supported our government's efforts to establish peace on the Korean Peninsula at every occasion, and asked for her continued interest and support," Moon's presidential office Cheong Wa Dae said in a press release.

The UNESCO chief praised Moon for his efforts to establish lasting peace on the peninsula, and said the Paris-based U.N. agency will closely cooperate with the peace initiative, the press release said.

The South Korean president arrived here Saturday on a four-day state visit. He was set to embark on a three-day trip to Rome and the Vatican later in the day.

Source: Yonhap News Agency

S. Korean president, UNESCO chief vow efforts toward inter-Korean reconciliation

PARIS, The leaders of South Korea and UNESCO agreed Tuesday to promote reconciliation between the divided Koreas partly through increased assistance for North Korea in education and other areas.

In a meeting held in Paris, South Korean President Moon Jae-in and UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay also agreed to joint efforts to designate the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) as a biosphere reserve, a move that comes after Moon and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un agreed to turn the DMZ into a peace zone in their bilateral summits held in April and May.

The DMZ is a four-kilometer wide buffer zone along the heavily-fortified military demarcation line that separates the two Koreas.

The Koreas technically remain at war as the 1950-53 Korean War ended only with an armistice. Moon last met with the North Korean leader in Pyongyang in September, in which the leaders declared a de facto end to the war by signing what Seoul has called a non-aggression pact.

"President Moon expressed gratitude that Director-General Azoulay has supported our government's efforts to establish peace on the Korean Peninsula at every occasion, and asked for her continued interest and support," Moon's presidential office Cheong Wa Dae said in a press release.

The UNESCO chief praised Moon for his efforts to establish lasting peace on the peninsula, and said the Paris-based U.N. agency will closely cooperate with the peace initiative, the press release said.

The South Korean president arrived here Saturday on a four-day state visit. He was set to embark on a three-day trip to Rome and the Vatican later in the day.

Source: Yonhap News Agency

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