Category: featured

Efficient public administration central to attaining development goals – Ban

23 June 2014 – Marking United Nations Public Service Day, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon hailed today the invaluable contributions of public servants and administrators in the international community’s efforts to build a better world for all.

“At a time of complex and interdependent global challenges, effective governance and efficient public administration are central to meeting our development goals. They will also be vital for implementing the post-2015 development agenda,” Mr. Ban said in a message for the Day, observed annually on 23 June.

UN Public Service Day aims to celebrate the value and virtue of public service to the community; highlight the contribution of public service in the development process; recognize the work of public servants; and encourage young people to pursue careers in the public sector.

Since the first awards ceremony in 2003, the Organization has received an increasing number of submissions from all around the world. The 2014 UN Public Service Day Awards Ceremony and Forum opened today in Seoul, Republic of Korea, and will run through 26 June.

Focusing on the theme “Innovating Governance for Sustainable Development and Well-being of the People,” the Forum was organized by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Division for Public Administration and Development Management, in partnership with the UN Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), in collaboration with the Government of the Republic of Korea.

In his message, the UN chief said the 2014 commemoration will recognize 19 public institutions from 14 countries for their outstanding achievements. The winners and finalists come from different regions and different levels of development, but what they have in common is having overcome complex challenges through innovative public service.

“They have revitalized education for the marginalized, enhanced transparency and accountability, supported environmental protection and deployed technology to increase the efficiency of health and water services,” the Secretary-General said, adding that these trail-blazing efforts have resulted in greater equity and inclusion in the delivery of public services in their communities.

Mr. Ban congratulated the institutions for their dedication to excellence, and encouraged “all who work in public service to learn from them and take inspiration from their successes.”

President Barroso’s speech at the Euroscience Open Forum

European Commission

[Check Against Delivery]

José Manuel Durão Barroso

President of the European Commission

President Barroso’s speech at the Euroscience Open Forum

Science building bridges

Euroscience Open Forum

Copenhagen, 22 June 2014

Your Majesty,

Dear Minister [Sofie Carsten-Nielsen, Minister of Higher Education and Science]

Dear Chair of ESOF [ESOF2014 Champion Professor Klaus Bock]

Dear President [Euroscience President, Professor Lauritz Holm-Nielsen]

Distinguished Guests,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

It gives me great pleasure to be here with you today for the 2014 Euroscience Open Forum. I would like to thank you for inviting me to take part in this very important event.

In a country with over 400 islands, with three bridges over six kilometres long, what more appropriate theme could have been given to this Forum than “Science building bridges”.

A country world-known for its scientific leadership; for its expertise across a range of fields, from clean technology to biotechnology, from pharmaceuticals to telecommunications.

A country proud and confident about its knowledge-based society, renowned for its openness, and desire to cooperate internationally; a country whose bridge, the Oresund Bridge, links, not just two countries, i.e. Sweden and Denmark, but Europe’s regions, from Scandinavia to Western and Central Europe.

Your Majesty,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

[Europe 2020/Horizon 2020]

As we start to move out of the worst financial and economic crisis since the 1930s, now is the time to focus on building a strong, sustainable future.

On building a bridge between our past scientific traditions and a world where we share increasingly important global challenges and where we need innovative solutions.

That is precisely why, back in 2010, we put in place our new Europe 2020 strategy, designed to build a balanced, knowledge-based economy, with education, science, research and innovation at its very heart.

That is also why we have managed to make the seven year budget for our European research programme, Horizon 2020, 30% larger than its predecessor, despite the slight decrease in the European budget as a whole. It was not easy but we got it. We managed to convince Member States that at least the science and innovation budget should be increased. At 80 billion Euros over seven years, Horizon 2020 is one of if not the largest research and innovation programme in the world, designed to complement other sources of national and private financing.

We have therefore managed to match ambition with resources, giving you the researchers the stability and long term commitment that you need.

This goes to show, as we discuss the challenges facing us in the years ahead, that science does indeed matter for the future of Europe.

Not just to a large audience such as yours, but to everyone in our societies. Because I believe that our social and economic progress and many of the solutions to today’s problems will come from science. And I would even say that “The future of Europe is science”.

[Successes]

As our recent Communication on research and innovation as sources for growth has shown, we have a lot to be confident about.

Europe undoubtedly remains a world leader in science and has the capacity to innovate.

Our European Research Area remains the largest knowledge-production house in the world: we have twice the number of science and technology graduates in Europe than in the United States; and with 7% of the world’s population, we still produce roughly a third not only of the GDP, but also of patents and high impact scientific publications.

And despite the financial and economic crisis we have managed to halve the innovation gap that we still have with the United States and Japan.

[More to do]

But we cannot afford to stand still, in a world where scientific and technological progress is accelerating at an unprecedented pace, and where South Korea is moving further ahead, with China quickly catching us up.

So we must adapt to the new challenges and new ways of working in the 21st Century.

The role of digital technologies and the wealth of information and data that is being produced pose many questions about how science and research will be performed in the future. I know that Commissioner Geoghegan-Quinn, whom I would like to congratulate, for her commitment and passion on these issues during her term as Commissioner, will discuss this particular matter with you on Tuesday morning.

We must also adapt our culture so that women are better represented in research and science, another matter close to my heart: indeed, whilst women hold 45% of all PhDs in Europe, they only represent 30% of career researchers.

Last but not least, we must bring in our younger generation into science and innovation, reinforcing and tailoring our educational systems so that they more fully embrace creativity and risk.

This is key to Europe’s future.

Your Majesty,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Allow me to highlight briefly five bridges that we have been building and that we must collectively continue to build.

First, we are building bridges between all the scientific disciplines. Our Innovation Union seeks to mainstream science and innovation across all sectors, and cross-fertilise your ideas to develop new technologies, products and services for the complex multi-disciplinary challenges in our societies. This is why Horizon 2020 champions a challenge-based approach and why the European Institute of Innovation and Technology, recently launched its Call for Proposals for the Knowledge and Innovation Communities.

Secondly, we are building bridges between researchers and the general public. Horizon 2020 is a large programme, with a broad set of objectives from excellence in science – with the European Research Council now chaired by Professor Bourguignon – to industrial leadership and a number of key societal challenges, allowing us to focus on the big priorities relevant to every European citizen. I am very proud of the ERC. But in order to ensure that the progress you make, for example on new vaccinations or nano-technology, is properly explained and embraced rather than feared, across society, we need a considerable communication effort from scientists themselves as well as from policy makers. There is an important role for the media here.

Thirdly, we are building bridges between the laboratory and the marketplace. After 30 years of negotiation, we finally agreed a European-wide patent. Once fully implemented, this will reduce the cost by up to 80% for small and medium sized businesses and individual researchers to register their creative ideas. This should encourage more private investment, because at 1.30% of GDP, we still lag behind the United States, Japan or South Korea, where private investment, venture capital and the culture of risk are more widely shared.

Fourthly, we are building bridges between Member States. With the European Research Area, we are encouraging reforms for a greater mobility of researchers and for pan-European research infrastructures.

But our countries must make an equal effort in research if we are to bridge the gap in investment across Europe, and if research opportunities are available across Europe. Collectively, we are missing our Europe 2020 target of 3% GDP in research and development, averaging just under 2%, with more regional disparity and ten Member States still averaging under 1%. We are doing fiscal consolidation but we need smart fiscal consolidation.

Finally, we are building bridges internationally, trying to reach out to all countries in the world. Only two weeks ago, I signed an agreement with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, granting Israel – a leading nation in science and innovation – access to our Horizon 2020 programme, as part of our science diplomacy. The principle behind this agreement, as well as with agreements we have with twenty other partners, is simple: it is that we can tackle together more smartly and efficiently the global challenges we face. And this is also why I am pleased to see so many international participants at today’s Forum.

[Conclusion]

Your Majesty,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

We cannot afford to rest.

And although Niels Bohr once said that prediction is very difficult, especially if it is about the future, I have nevertheless asked the Science and Technology Advisory Council and Professor Anne Glover, my Chief Scientific Adviser, to produce a report on foresight. Let me take this opportunity to thank them for their dedication to this work, which will be unveiled in the conference “The future of Europe is science”, to be held in Lisbon on 6th and 7th of October.

I look forward to a successful Euroscience Forum and to an ever increasing role of Europe in science and innovation, with a view to the next Forum in 2016, in Manchester.

Thank you.

Landmark agreement between the European Commission and South Korea on 5G mobile technology

European Commission

Press release

Seoul/Brussels, 16 June 2014

Landmark agreement between the European Commission and South Korea on 5G mobile technology

An agreement signed in Seoul today is a milestone in the global race to develop 5G mobile technologies. Neelie Kroes, Vice-President of the European Commission for the Digital Agenda, and Mr Mun-Kee CHOI, South Korea’s Minister of Science, ICT and Future Planning (MSIP) have agreed to work towards a global definition of 5G and to cooperate in 5G research. They also agreed on the need for harmonized radio spectrum to ensure global interoperability and on the preparation of global standards for 5G.

Both sides signed a Joint Declaration on Strategic Cooperation in Information Communications Technology (ICT) and 5G, agreeing to deepen discussions in the area of Net Futures (network and communications, 5G, cloud computing), an element of on-going relations on ICT topics. Both sides will also work towards a coordinated call for research project proposals, to be launched in 2016. An industry memorandum of understanding will be signed between the EU’s 5G Infrastructure Association (whose members include Alcatel-Lucent, Atos, Deutsche Telekom, Ericsson, Nokia, Orange, Telecom Italia, Telenor and Telefonica) and South Korea’s 5G Forum.

Vice President @Neelie KroesEU said “5G will become the new lifeblood of the digital economy and digital society once it is established. Both Europe and South Korea recognise this. This is the first time ever that public authorities have joined together in this way, with the support of private industry, to push forward the process of standardisation. Today’s declaration signals our commitment to being global digital leaders.”

5G is a new network technology and infrastructure that will bring the capacities needed to cope with the massive growth in the use of communication – especially wireless – technologies by humans and by machines. 5G won’t just be faster, it will bring new functionalities and applications with high social and economic value. (see MEMO/14/129 on What 5G can do for you)

The two sides reaffirmed to strengthen the agreement of the November 2013 summit meeting, where both sides agreed on promoting R&D collaboration in the area of ICT. As a follow up, both sides decided to set up a Korea-EU ICT working group to prepare for ICT R&D cooperation as well as relevant policy discussions in the areas of 5G, Cloud and Internet of Things (IoT), and eventually to launch jointly funded R&D programs (’coordinated call’) in 2016-2017.

Background

In December 2013 the Commission launched a Public-Private Partnership on 5G (IP/13/1261Factsheet). The EU is investing €700 million over the next seven years into the 5GPPP through the Horizon 2020 programme. EU industry is set to match this investment by up to 5 times, to more than 3 billion euros. South Korea is investing and coordinating research its efforts through 5G Forum and there are other major public and industry-led initiatives s in China, Japan, Taiwan and the US

In February 2014 at the World Mobile Congress 2014, Neelie Kroes called for bold steps towards global consensus on the scope of 5G (SPEECH/14/155): “Let’s find a global consensus on the scope of 5G, its main technological constituents, and the timetable for putting it in place. Let’s work this out together. And let’s work it out soon: by the end of 2015. So all our citizens can get the 5G boost as early as possible.”

For more information

Video statement (EBS) by Ryan HEATH, Spokesperson for Digital Agenda

Towards 5G

5G-PPP

Annex

JOINT DECLARATION BETWEEN THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA AND THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION ON STRATEGIC COOPERATION IN THE AREA OF INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY AND 5G

Mun-kee CHOI, Minister of the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (MSIP) of the Republic of Korea, and Neelie KROES, Vice-President for European Commission, responsible for the EU Digital Agenda (hereinafter referred to as “two sides”) held an official meeting on 16 June 2014, where the two sides exchanged views on the enhancement of bilateral co-operation and exchanges between governments, research institutes, educational institutions, private companies, and other organizations.

The two sides reaffirmed to strengthen the agreement of the November 2013 summit meeting, where both sides agreed on promoting R&D collaboration in the area of Information Communications Technology (ICT). As a follow up, both sides decided to set up a Korea-EU ICT working group to prepare for ICT R&D cooperation as well as relevant policy discussions in the areas of 5G, Cloud and Internet of Things (IoT), and eventually to launch jointly funded R&D programs (’coordinated call’) in 2016-2017.

The two sides recognised the great importance of timely developing the next generation of mobile communication networks (5G), because the communications infrastructure will be the backbone of the future digital economy, creating more and better jobs, and contributing to a sustainable economic growth for the mutual benefit of the Republic of Korea and the European Union (EU).

The two sides agreed to enhance cooperation in the field of the future generation of communication networks (5G), fostering global consensus on the definition of 5G, developing common interest in research activities, harmonising radio spectrum policy to ensure global interoperability and preparing global standardization for 5G.

The two sides also agreed to jointly work in the area of future mobile network on the following:

  • To strive to reach a global consensus, by the end of 2015, on the broad definition, the key functionalities, and target time table for 5G.

  • To work together to explore further possibilities in cooperating and implementing joint research actions in the field of 5G, to be launched in 2016. To work together towards global standards for 5G, in support of ongoing standardization in relevant fora, such as 3GPP and ITU.

  • To cooperate to facilitate the identification of globally harmonised radio frequency band to meet the additional spectrum requirements for 5G, and to reinforce cooperation in the context of ITU and WRC.

The two sides recognised the importance of public-private partnerships for 5G, and expressed support for the deepening of interactions and exchanges between industry associations dealing with 5G in the EU and in Korea.

Done in Seoul, the Republic of Korea, on June 16, 2014 in English language.

Mun-Kee CHOI

Minister of the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, the Republic of Korea

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Neelie KROES

Vice-President for the European Commission responsible for the Digital Agenda

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